Evidence HubWhat Works Resources

 

Watch our latest video showcasing the latest evidence from Stepping Stones and Creating Futures, which has seen a reduction in violence in informal settlements in South Africa. Violence against women and girls is preventable.

HD Version (mp4, 288MB)

Additional Info

  • VAWG themes VAWG & social norms
  • Country Democratic Republic of Congo
  • Project Tearfund - DRC

Additional Info

  • VAWG themes VAWG & social norms
  • Country Democratic Republic of Congo
  • Project Tearfund - DRC

The Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) has experienced years of conflict. Millions have died or been displaced, and basic services have collapsed. Violence against women and girls (VAWG) is very high, fuelled by gender inequality. The 2014 Demographic and Health Survey in the DRC found that 57% of ever married women aged 15–49 had experienced intimate partner violence (IPV) in their lifetime and 16% had experienced non-partner sexual violence in the 12 months prior to the survey.

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Stern, E., & Carlson, K. (2019). Indashyikirwa Women’s Safe Spaces: Informal Response for Survivors of IPV within a Rwandan Prevention Programme. Social Sciences, 8(3), 76.

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Additional Info

  • VAWG themes Costs of violence
  • Country Ghana

This flyer presents key findings of research undertaken by ISSER in collaboration with National University of Ireland, Galway, International Center for Research on Women, and Ipsos MORI with funding from UK Department for International Development. The research design includes nationally representative survey of 2002 women aged 18-60 across the 10 regions of Ghana, qualitative research including focus group discussions, in-depth interviews, and key informant interviews, and survey of 805 employees (391 female and 414 male employees) across 100 businesses in Accra and Kumasi.

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Cislaghi, B., Denny, E. K., Cissé, M., Gueye, P., Shrestha, B., Shrestha, P. N., ... & Clark, C. J. (2019). Changing Social Norms: the Importance of “Organized Diffusion” for Scaling Up Community Health Promotion and Women Empowerment Interventions. Prevention Science, 1-11.

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Jewkes, R., Corboz, J., & Gibbs, A. (2019). Violence against Afghan women by husbands, mothers-in-law and siblings-in-law/siblings: Risk markers and health consequences in an analysis of the baseline of a randomised controlled trial. PloS one, 14(2), e0211361.

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Willan, S., Ntini, N., Gibbs, A., & Jewkes, R. (2019). Exploring young women’s constructions of love and strategies to navigate violent relationships in South African informal settlements. Culture, health & sexuality, 1-15.
 

Additional Info

  • VAWG themes VAWG & social norms
  • Country Pakistan
  • Project Right to Play - Pakistan

Additional Info

  • VAWG themes VAWG & social norms
  • Country Pakistan
  • Project Right to Play - Pakistan

Additional Info

  • VAWG themes VAWG & disability
Clark, C. J., Ferguson, G., Shrestha, B., Shrestha, P. N., Batayeh, B., Bergenfeld, I., ... & McGhee, S. (2019). Mixed methods assessment of women’s risk of intimate partner violence in Nepal. BMC women's health, 19(1), 20.
 

Additional Info

  • VAWG themes VAWG & social norms
  • Country Nepal
  • Project VSO International - Nepal
  • Date of publication 24 January 2019

Nepali women and girls are vulnerable to violence at the hands of their husbands and in-laws. The key drivers of women’s vulnerability to violence against women and girls (VAWG) in the migrant communities of Nepal include gender inequitable norms, the lower position of young married women in the family, poor spousal and in-law relations, and poverty. In this context, working with the family has great potential to reduce violence and improve the conditions of women and girls.

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Additional Info

  • Country Rwanda
  • Project Indashyikirwa - Rwanda

This set of skills-building modules is designed to prepare Indashyikirwa community activists (CAs) to conduct community-based activist activities. Building off the foundation of learning from the Indashyikirwa Couples’ Curriculum, the sessions focus on specific skills that are necessary to do effective activism at the community level. There are 16 numbered topics, sequenced to foster progressive learning.

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Additional Info

  • Country Rwanda
  • Project Indashyikirwa - Rwanda

The Couples’ Curriculum is a set of interactive trainings and take-home exercises designed to help foster a process of change to reduce gender-based violence amongst couples in Rwandan communities. As part of the What Works to Prevent Violence Against Women and Girls initiative, the structure and content is built upon the latest learning from the field of GBV prevention about what makes effective GBV prevention.

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Additional Info

  • Country Rwanda
  • Project Indashyikirwa - Rwanda

Gender-based violence has been recognized as a cross cutting issue affecting the lives of victims, families, and whole communities from diversity of dimensions including health, economy, culture, psychology, education, livelihoods and political participation. In fact, GBV is considered one of the critical areas of action in Rwanda. This presents a key opportunity for different players, including government agencies, NGOs, opinion leaders and all stakeholders to build an understanding on issues of GBV.

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Additional Info

  • Country Rwanda
  • Project Indashyikirwa - Rwanda

This module is tailored to women trained women’s facilitators at community level to Foster positive change. The module was developed following the establishment of women’s spaces as safe venues for women at community level to interact and exchange of their day to day life challenges mainly on how they can prevent GBV and overcome its consequences. It is intended to improve knowledge, attitudes, skills, and actions of women; facilitate women to connect with other women on key GBV issues and support each other to collectively organize themselves for change. The training module also aims at creating an enabling environment for gender equality and GBV prevention and response in communities.

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Additional Info

  • Author Giulia Ferrari, Sergio Torres-Rueda, Christine Michaels-Igbokwe, Charlotte Watts and Anna Vassall
  • Date of publication 12 December 2018

Click here to download the guidelines and a zipped folder containing the beta version of the costing tool in excel. Unzip the folder, and start costing your intervention using the guidelines alongside the costing tool. Look out for the "worked examples" boxes in the guidelines. They show you how to record a specific cost step-by-step in the costing tool, and point you to the cells in the costing tool where you will find exactly the "example data" described in the guidelines (remember to delete these "example data" once you start costing your project). Happy costing, and please remember to send us feedback and queries on the costing tool (it is a beta version),at giulia.ferrari@lshtm.ac.uk or sergio.torresrueda@lshtm.ac.uk with the title “What Works beta costing tool feedback” to help us improve it!”

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Additional Info

  • VAWG themes Costs of violence
  • Country Bangladesh
  • Project HERrespect - Bangladesh

Violence against women (VAW) is a human rights violation and a barrier to achieving inclusive growth and sustainable business.

An estimated 35 percent of women worldwide have experienced physical and/or sexual intimate partner violence or non-partner rape at some point in their lives.1 Unacceptable rates of violence and harassment extend well beyond the home into the world of work, as clearly demonstrated by the #MeToo movement.

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Parvin, K., Al Mamun, M., Gibbs, A., Jewkes, R., & Naved, R. T. (2018). The pathways between female garment workers’ experience of violence and development of depressive symptoms. PLoS one, 13(11), e0207485.

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Gibbs, A., Dunkle, K., Willan, S., Jama-Shai, N., Washington, L., & Jewkes, R. (2018). Are women’s experiences of emotional and economic intimate partner violence associated with HIV-risk behaviour? A cross-sectional analysis of young women in informal settlements in South Africa. AIDS Care, 1-8.

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Gupta, J., Cardoso, L. F., Ferguson, G., Shrestha, B., Shrestha, P. N., Harris, C., ... & Clark, C. J. (2018). Disability status, intimate partner violence and perceived social support among married women in three districts of the Terai region of Nepal. BMJ Global Health, 3(5), e000934.

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Naved, R. T., Al Mamun, M., Parvin, K., Willan, S., Gibbs, A., Yu, M., & Jewkes, R. (2018). Magnitude and correlates of intimate partner violence against female garment workers from selected factories in Bangladesh. PloS one, 13(11), e0204725.

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Additional Info

  • VAWG themes VAWG & social norms
  • Country South Africa
  • Date of publication October 2018

Violence against women and girls is widespread in South Africa. Women who experience intimate partner violence (IPV) and non-partner sexual violence have poorer health outcomes, including higher levels of depression and alcohol use, and are more likely to acquire HIV.

In the eThekwini Municipality of South Africa, approximately 40% of the population live in informal settlements. With a combination of poverty and unemployment, widespread violence, racism and xenophobia, urban informal settlements have very high levels of violence against women, mental trauma, alcohol and drug abuse, and HIV

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Khuwaja, H. M. A., Karmaliani, R., McFarlane, J., Somani, R., Gulzar, S., Ali, T. S., ... & Jewkes, R. (2018). The intersection of school corporal punishment and associated factors: Baseline results from a randomized controlled trial in Pakistan. PLoS one, 13(10), e0206032.

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A brief is a concise summary of a particular issue, research project/ intervention, research findings, or initiative. It should have a clear purpose and key messages, e.g. providing evidence to inform policy change, or inspiring an action that will help your intervention or organization to influence policy, attract requests for further information or funding, and/or broaden the knowledge base of all key stakeholders.

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When the Gender Centre conceptualized its Nkyinkyim Anti-violence Project/Rural Response System, it recognized the need to put together a comprehensive training programme for its partners to ensure a full understanding of violence against women in order to be able to respond effectively to victims of violence in those communities where its partners operated. The training programme was also intended to train other civil society organisations as well as state agencies such as the Police, health and social welfare personnel and indeed all stakeholders who interacted with victims of violence in any way. The manual has been the main resource for training of our COMBAT members.

If you would like to get access to the full curricula please email Dorcas Coker-Appiah at d.cokerappiah@gendercentreghana.org

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