Projects

  • Prevention of Violence Against Women and Girls Prevention of Violence Against Women and Girls

    Afghanistan | Help the Afghan Children

    Help the Afghan Children (HTAC) will use the innovation grant to implement a far reaching peace and civic education programme, that works with girls, women, boys, male leaders and families to promote an understanding of women’s rights and build healthy relationship skills based on peaceful conflict resolution.

    Read more...
  • Women for Women International Trial Women for Women International Trial

    South African Medical Research Council | Intervention – Women for Women International

    Women for Women International offers marginalised women survivors of conflict a tried and tested year-long, combined social and economic empowerment programme that includes:

    1. Informational training in critical modules that include the value of women’s work, benefits of saving, basic health education, rights and decision making, and group formation;
    2. Skill-building in numeracy, business skills and a chosen vocational skill;
    3. Resource provision in the form of a monthly cash stipend, asset transfers for vocational activities, savings channel provision, and referrals to health and legal services; and
    4. Connections to local women’s networks and global supporters as well as connections to other women, by creating a safe and comfortable space where women, in groups of 25, learn, share and support one another to initiate change in their lives.

    Read more...
Evidence

Violence against women and girls (VAWG) is an important human rights concern and a pervasive issue affecting women and girls during times of conflict and humanitarian crisis. In 2016, the What Works to Prevent VAWG programme published an evidence brief [GF1] summarising the existing evidence base on VAWG in these settings. While the brief demonstrated that there is very limited evidence on what works to prevent and respond to VAWG in conflict and humanitarian settings, it did highlight key areas of learning and specify what information gaps remain.

Since the publication of the 2016 What Works evidence brief, researchers and practitioners have continued to conduct research and expand the international community’s knowledge base around VAWG and the effectiveness of programmes that seek to prevent and respond to this violence. These efforts include new results from eight research studies conducted by members of the What Works consortium in various conflict-affected and humanitarian settings. This new brief synthesises the key results of these What Works studies as well as other key findings from contemporaneous research efforts published since 2015. It aims to provide an up-to-date resource for practitioners, policymakers and researchers on the state of evidence on VAWG in conflict and humanitarian settings.

  pdf Download (2.52 MB)

26 September 2019

Corboz, J., Siddiq, W., Hemat, O., Chirwa, E. D., & Jewkes, R. (2019). What works to prevent violence against children in Afghanistan? Findings of an interrupted time series evaluation of a school-based peace education and community social norms change intervention in Afghanistan. PLoS one, 14(8), e0220614.

  pdf Download (640 KB)

04 September 2019

Corboz, J., Gibbs, A., & Jewkes, R. (2019). Bacha posh in Afghanistan: factors associated with raising a girl as a boy. Culture, health & sexuality, 1-14.

pdf Download (1.52 MB)

17 June 2019

For over 40 years, Afghanistan has experienced ongoing conflict and insecurity. This insecurity has increased in recent years, exacerbating household poverty and further entrenching women’s subordinate position in the home [1, 2]. Afghanistan remains a deeply patriarchal and heteronormative society with strict codes of gender segregation and policing of women’s mobility and sexuality. Women’s economic autonomy is severely limited and many women experience intimate partner violence (IPV). The International Men and Gender Equality Survey (IMAGES) in 2018, conducted nationally, found that in the past year half (49.6%) of married women in Afghanistan had experienced physical IPV, and two-thirds (69.7%) had been stopped from working outside the home [2].

pdf Download (3.08 MB)

04 June 2019

Jewkes, R., Corboz, J., & Gibbs, A. (2019). Violence against Afghan women by husbands, mothers-in-law and siblings-in-law/siblings: Risk markers and health consequences in an analysis of the baseline of a randomised controlled trial. PloS one, 14(2), e0211361.

pdf Download (395 KB)

07 February 2019

Women for Women International works with marginalized women in countries affected by conflict around the world. Our core women’s empowerment program was initiated 25 years ago. It is tried and tested 12-month integrated program that supports women to earn and save money, improve health and well-being, influence decisions and connect to networks.

document Download (39 KB)

10 October 2018

HTAC have developed a school-based peace education, peaceful conflict resolution and community social norms change intervention with multiple components. It focuses on play-based learning and transformation, working with both pupils and teachers in the schools. They work with and empower girls and boys in the schools.

pdf Download (3.14 MB)

10 October 2018

HTAC have developed a school-based peace education, peaceful conflict resolution and community social norms change intervention with multiple components. It focuses on play-based learning and transformation, working with both pupils and teachers in the schools. They work with and empower girls and boys in the schools.

pdf Download (3.24 MB)

10 October 2018

Jewkes, R., Corboz, J., & Gibbs, A. (2018). Trauma exposure and IPV experienced by Afghan women: Analysis of the baseline of a randomised controlled trial. PLoS one, 13(10), e0201974.  

pdf Download (985 KB)

10 October 2018
Page 1 of 3